Wedding Submissions Rejected: 4 Reasons Why It Happened

Happy new week dolls and hunks, today’s post is in the blogging direction, most likely suitable to the wedding vendors/bloggers and not the brides and grooms, so please bear with me.

There is something that almost always leaves a bad taste in my mouth as a wedding blogger and that has to do with the case of wedding submissions rejected, it’s even worse when the submission was made by the bride…yikes, that really aches my heart!

Wedding Submission rejected

It’s never fun to say no because as humans with feelings, it’s easy to dwell on that “rejection” which many times brings a negative vibe instead of a positive one. So this post is my attempt to reduce if not totally eradicate the situations where I have to reject wedding submissions made to Knotsvilla.

Okay, I may not be able to fully eradicate it but it’s totally worth a shot to try right?

Wedding Submissions Rejected: 4 Reasons Why It Happened

1. NOT THE RIGHT NICHE

I believe this to be the #1 reason for many submission rejections. When a blog specifically caters to weddings of a particular niche and a vendor submits something totally out of niche, a rejection is almost always guaranteed.

Some blogs have a wide niche-net but others have much smaller ones; some focusing on weddings in particular locations, weddings of a particular style or weddings of a particular price range. All these should be kept in mind by the vendors when making their submissions so as to not submit amiss and then be rejected.

2. OMITTED VENDOR INFORMATION

The wedding industry is a referral based one, so giving credit where it is due is of high importance. When making a submission to a wedding blog without including all the vendors of the event two things can happen which all end up creating additional (unnecessary) work for the blogger;

a. Should the blogger go ahead and publish such a submission and an omitted vendor sees the publication, that vendor may not be thrilled that their name/information was left out. On a good day, such vendor might send a polite email asking for their name to be included and the blogger would have to go back and edit the post – additional work.

On a bad day, the omitted vendor might be very upset right off the bat and go off on the said blogger not understanding that the lack of information is really no fault of the blogger.

b. The blogger might choose not to publish such publication until all the vendors are included. This may cause a delay and additional work to the blogger if she/he has to fish out this information on their own (in cases where the name of the vendor is given but no website/contact information.)

Depending on how much time/tolerance a blogger has for these additional tasks, such a submission can easily end up in the rejection pile.

3. LACK OF ENGAGEMENT FROM PREVIOUS PUBLICATIONS

As bloggers who are real human beings and not auto-bots, we do have feelings too. While we are always over-the-top excited when we receive gorgeous wedding submissions that fit our blog niches, it’s never fun when the submitter (vendor) has no engagement on the publication whatsoever. By engagement I mean, sharing with his/her followers, sharing with the couple in question or even sending a note or commenting on the post to express his/her appreciation/excitement.

This could unintentionally sour a relationship between that blogger and the said vendor and possibly affect how the blogger views future submissions from that vendor, which may not be as positive as it would have been had there been engagement on previous publications.

4. EXACT SUBMISSION HAS BEEN SUBMITTED TO OTHER/WAY TOO MANY BLOGS

Truth is, as bloggers we take exclusivity issues very seriously. And this is why; as a reader, if you get a hold of your favorite books only to open them and see they have exact same content, how does that make you feel? Not great, I’d assume. That is the sole reason why blogs have exclusivity policies; we want our readers to experience new and fresh content as much as possible.

Different blogs have their exclusivity policies, here at KV it’s a 4 months wait before a vendor should submit their work to other blogs after it has been published on Knotsvilla. It also adds that the submissions we receive should not have been published on other blogs except from the vendor’s blogs.

When a vendor does not adhere to a blog’s exclusivity policy and is discovered, the chances of accepting future submissions from that vendor is reduced if not non-existent.


For the vendors, hope this post clarifies a few things for you and points you in the right direction when submitting to blogs! As a blog, Knotsvilla would be nothing without the gorgeous submissions we receive and we are never tired of them, so keep em’ coming!

Original Photo by Joanna Moss Photography from this gorgeous Pink Ombre styled shoot submitted to Knotsvilla!

Happy new week!

About The Author

Wedding Blog Editor & Consultant
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Gee || Jesus Lover || Wedding Blog Editor- KnotsVilla (Blog for theme-ful, Prop-ful, Color-ful & Culture-ful Weddings || Wedding Planning? I'd be the best e-friend you ever had!

4 Responses

  1. Berry Dakara

    I’m not in the wedding industry at all, but I like the information provided in this post. It shows that you care about your readers and the content you put out there. Hopefully vendors use this as a guide for future submissions here and across other sites.

    Reply
    • Gee | KnotsVilla

      Yes Berry, because vendors are a huge part of running a wedding blog professionally, these kinds of posts have to come up once in a while to help foster a better blogger-vendor-reader relationship 🙂

      Reply
  2. Jax Sutton

    Excellent advice! I hate saying no but at the end of the day its my passion, reputation and business at stake and just because it isnt right for my blog doesnt mean your day wasnt amazing! Love ‘we are real human beings and have feelings too’ sometimes I think people forget that! xoxox

    Reply

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